Home Page
RABiD BUNNY FEVER
K.T.K

  • June 19, 2019, 02:00:08 AM *
  • Welcome, Guest
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Official site launch very soon, hurrah!



Post reply

Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
Unless you're sure you want to reply, please consider starting a new topic.
Name:
Email:
Subject:
Message icon:

Verification:
Type the letters shown in the picture
Listen to the letters / Request another image

Type the letters shown in the picture:
What Japanese food is made of raw fish and rice?:
What is nine times nine?:

shortcuts: hit alt+s to submit/post or alt+p to preview


Topic Summary

Posted by: Dakusan
« on: December 07, 2018, 03:29:27 PM »

Original post for Auto Locking Windows on Login can be found at https://www.castledragmire.com/Posts/Auto_Locking_Windows_on_Login.
Originally posted on: 12/08/18

On my primary computer (whose harddrive is encrypted) I always have Windows auto logging in to help with the bootup time. However, my bootup time can be rather slow; and if I needed to have my computer booted but locked, I had to wait for the login to complete so I could lock the computer. This has been becoming a nuisance lately when I need to get out of my house quickly in the morning.

For the solution I created a windows boot entry that auto locks the computer after logging the user in. This also requires a batch file, to run for the user on startup, to detect when this boot entry was selected. Here are the steps to create this setup:


  1. Create the new boot entry:In the windows command line, run: bcdedit /copy {current} /d "Lock on Startup"
    This creates a new boot option, duplicated from your currently selected boot option, in the boot menu labeled “Lock on Startup”.
  2. (Optional) Change the bootup timeout:In the windows command line, run: bcdedit /timeout 5
    Where 5 is a 5 second timeout.
  3. Create a batch file to run on login:In your start menu’s startup folder, add a batch file. You can name it anything as long as the extension is “.bat”.
    Add the following to the file: bcdedit /enum {current} | findstr /r /c:"description  *Lock on Startup" && rundll32.exe user32.dll,LockWorkStation
    Note that there are 2 spaces in the description search string to replicate the regular expression's 1 or more quantifier “+”, since findstr only supports the 0 or more quantifier “*”.